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The title text also refers to {{w|Comet ISON}}. In February, a rough estimate of the comet's behavior predicted that it would become brighter than the full moon, a prediction that was widely reported by the media even though it was based on limited data and astronomers knew that it would not reach this brightness. In the end, although it was visible to the naked eye, it was never as bright as anybody hoped and apparently disintegrated on November 28, 2013, at its close approach to the sun.
 
The title text also refers to {{w|Comet ISON}}. In February, a rough estimate of the comet's behavior predicted that it would become brighter than the full moon, a prediction that was widely reported by the media even though it was based on limited data and astronomers knew that it would not reach this brightness. In the end, although it was visible to the naked eye, it was never as bright as anybody hoped and apparently disintegrated on November 28, 2013, at its close approach to the sun.
  
βˆ’
The title text also refers to the {{w|2017 total eclipse}}, which was visible as a partial eclipse for a few hours throughout North America on August 21 Monday, including a 100-mile wide band across the United States where it was a total {{w|eclipse}} for a couple of minutes in the early afternoon. Eclipses are completely predictable - although the weather might be cloudy so that the sun is blocked during totality, they will happen anyway. So Megan is being extremely pessimistic to even suggest that the 2017 eclipse might get canceled. Humorously, her statement that someone might decide to cancel the eclipse makes it sound like a concert that could be canceled by the organizer. It seems that Megan thinks that the "they" who could cancel the eclipse are the same "they" that caused the comet to disintegrate and the solar activity to stay low. Anyone with the kind of power to stop a solar eclipse from happening would be God-like compared to humanity. The next time that the eclipse was mentioned was in the New Year comic for 2017: [[1779: 2017]]. The subject of the title text of that comic is the likelihood that the eclipse will indeed happen as planned.
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The title text also refers to the {{w|2017 total eclipse}}, which will be visible as a partial eclipse for a few hours throughout North America on August 21 Monday, including a 100-mile band across the United States where it will be a total {{w|eclipse}} for a couple of minutes in the early afternoon. Although the weather may be cloudy so the sun will be blocked during totality, the eclipse will happen anyway as there are completely predictable. So Megan is being extremely pessimistic to even suggest that it might get canceled. That she also states it like someone might decide to cancel the eclipse like it was a concert that could be canceled by the organizer is funny. Seems like Megan thinks "they" are the same that caused the comet to disintegrate and the solar activity to stay low. Anyone with the kind of power to stop a solar eclipse from happening would be God-like compared to humanity. Next time the eclipse was mentioned was in the New Year comic for 2017: [[1779: 2017]]. The subject of the title text of that comic is the likelihood that the eclipse will indeed happen as planed.
  
 
All in all, the comic suggests that the only events of significance to Megan (and Randall) are astronomical ones; the actions of humanity pale in comparison.
 
All in all, the comic suggests that the only events of significance to Megan (and Randall) are astronomical ones; the actions of humanity pale in comparison.

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